How To Heal A Split Bum Crack, It’s A Real Thing!

Want to know how to heal a split bum crack? Certainly the debate between using creams and leaving the butt area dry, taking medication or applying antibacterial cream has been discussed online (see examples below). But if you want to know the cause, it’s probably Intertrigo.

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How To Heal A Split Bum Crack: FAQs and Intertrigo

Common FAQs With Split Bum Crack

Q1: Hi my partner has a sore split at the top of his bum crack in between the buttocks. He showers regularly, but does sweat a lot due to working! He is in a lot of pain with it and can not bear to wipe properly after the toilet!

Answer: Hi, It seems that there might have been some bacterial infection due to more wetness and poor local hygiene due to not being reachable for cleaning. Apply antibiotic cream after proper cleaning. Go for one antibiotic medicine course. Keep local hygiene proper.

Q2: I have a cut/split at the top of my bum crack, can anyone help? The best way I can describe it is a small slit/ cut in the top of my bum, I suppose the way skin cracks when really dry? I’m not overweight at all, I don’t suffer from any skin conditions. (oh and i’m female if that makes any difference?) Also I have been with dp for 5 years and I have been 100% faithful and would like to think he has also. So the STI thing is very low if not at all!

Answers:

  • Go to your GP, it could be nothing but could also be the start of a pilonidal sinus. I’m a surgical nurse, and believe me it’s much better to head them off at the pass with antibiotics (if needed) than to ignore them and risk them getting worse. Scrupulous hygiene can help prevent them, but they can also be caused by ingrown hair, not just sweat/dirt. If left they turn into abscesses, hence the antibiotics.
  • I’ve had this when spending huge amounts of time sitting down (breastfeeding)- bathing everyday and trying not to sit down so much made it go away.
  • I have this – am in Australia ‘ put it down to irritation from sweating, how very charming…Don’t wear a thong or a G-string. You might be able to get some anti-chafing gel, cream or powder over the counter from a chemist to prevent it happening in future if you think it might come back.
  • I had this. It went with sudo creme and scrupulous hygiene. So I showered twice a day, made sure it was washed even though it was stingy and a thin layer of cream.
  • I am ashamed to say I think mine was caused by being too fat. It did give me an incentive to lose weight though. Every cloud and all that.
  • I’ve had something similar before due to sweat (I knew that gym wasn’t good for me). I used Asda Little Angels liquid talc which soon cleared it up.

Q3: This is embarrassing – but I have had this problem for about 2 years but it’s getting to the point where I can’t take it anymore. There is about a 2 inch slit/tear within my butt crack. It’s a couple inches south of the tailbone. I do not know what this is caused by. I sit at a desk all day, some people tell me it’s sweat, or a yeast problem? My regular MD doctor didn’t know what it would be caused from. I was instructed to keep it dry and then put desatin on it but that does nothing. I switched to bag balm, it heals it up for a few days and then it goes right back to being split open and starts to bleed a little. This stings when I take a shower too !! any suggestions on what I can do?

Answers:

  • Hello, one possibility is of pilonidal cyst. In this, the skin becomes reddened or even sometimes looks like a small bruise. When it is infected, it causes pain. Antibiotics or surgical drainage may be required. Look at the skin of the lower back. If you see a cyst or pus filled cyst, it can be a pilonidal cyst or an infection of the sebaceous glands of the skin in the area which can form into an abscess and thereby the acute pain. I feel that physical examination by a doctor is necessary to make a diagnosis. I hope it helps. Take care and regards.
  • I had this happen to my one time. I used cortisone cream and kept the area clean. It was gone in 2 days. I hope that helps.
  • A split in your skin is a split in your skin pure and simple. People can relate it to the sometimes split people have at the corner of their mouths. I have the same problem, I use aloe and vitamin e and keep it dry with baby powder. I did notice it usually happens if my skin becomes moist for too long, like when I sweat. I also noticed that it comes back more easily based on my diet, drinking too much etc. It’s likely to be a ph problem that inhibits the body’s natural defenses against normal bacteria. It becomes itchy and if you scratch the skin breaks and voila. Oddly enough antibacterial ointments do nothing, the skin does not heal back. Dry is best.
  • I have had this happen to me off and on since I was a little girl and I am now in my 30’s. I also have noticed that this seems to happen more so during the summer when it’s hot and I sweat more. I have felt it re-open when bending over to tie my shoes and I have also felt it re-open during intercourse. It sometimes takes time to heal but ointment and creams are definitely NOT the answer! KEEP THE AREA CLEAN AND DRY! applying ointment and creams will only keep the area open and potentially cause infections. Applying a mild powder (unscented), perhaps original baby powder, will help keep the area dry. Some people have this occur and get very self conscious about it, but are not aware that this is more common than people know and probably 8 out of every 10 people you know have this happen to them as well rather they admit it or not! It is painful and irritating but correct care to the area will surely help to keep this from reoccurring and free from infection.
  • Try vitamin C 500 mg twice a day. Clean the area twice a day with a baby cleanser. After cleaning that way, apply a thick coating of Eucerin ointment. I think you’ll heal quickly. It can recur.

Confused? Not confused? Amongst these questions there are some common factors related to Intertrigo that people experienced. So let’s get started with learning about Intertrigo.

Intertrigo

Intertrigo is a fancy name for a common skin rash that shows up between the folds of skin.

Symptoms of Intertrigo

What does intertrigo look like? It may cause:

  • Red or reddish-brown rash
  • Raw, itchy, or oozing skin
  • Foul odor
  • Cracked or crusty skin

Intertrigo can appear in any skin folds that rub together and trap moisture. In infants, intertrigo often appears to be a diaper rash.

If you have any symptoms of intertrigo, be sure to see your doctor who will check for the presence of infection.

Causes of Intertrigo

Intertrigo is an inflammatory skin infection that can be caused and worsened by many factors such as:

  • Moisture
  • Heat
  • Lack of air circulation
  • Friction between skin folds
  • Sweat, urine, and feces.

Intertrigo is often accompanied by an infection caused by:

  • Yeast
  • Other types of fungus
  • Bacteria

An Intertrigo infection is likely to arise in skin folds because these are areas that are warm and tend to stay moist. This creates a welcome environment for the growth of germs.

You are more likely to develop intertrigo if:

  • Obese
  • Have diabetes
  • Have a splint, brace, or artificial limb
  • Are exposed to high heat and humidity
  • Incontinence
  • Excessive sweating
  • Poor hygiene
  • Malnutrition
  • A suppressed immune system due to chemotherapy or HIV

Infants — with their chubbiness, shorter necks, and flexed posture are at maximum risk for intertrigo.

Some skin diseases such as psoriasis may also increase the development of intertrigo.

Treatment of Intertrigo

Your doctor may suggest keeping the affected area dry and exposed to the air.

Control oozing with moist compresses of an astringent such as Burow’s solution. Then air-dry with a hair dryer set on “cool.”

A barrier cream is also recommended to help protect skin from irritants.

Your doctor may recommend short-term use of a topical steroid to reduce inflammation in the area. If the area has an infection, your doctor may prescribe an antifungal or antibiotic cream or ointment. Sometimes you need an oral medication.

Prevention

Lower your risk in the future:

  • Shower and dry off thoroughly each day.
  • Keep your skin as dry and cool as you can.
  • Avoid wearing tight shoes or clothing.
  • For infants with diaper rash, change diapers more frequently.
  • If you are overweight, do what you can to lose weight.

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